Use of phytoremediation techniques for elimination of lead from polluted soils

Authors

  • Alžbeta Hegedűsová Department of Chemistry, Constantine the Philosopher University in Nitra, Tr. A. Hlinku 1, Nitra, SK- 949 01, Slovak Republic
  • Silvia Jakabová Department of Chemistry, Constantine the Philosopher University in Nitra, Tr. A. Hlinku 1, Nitra, SK- 949 01, Slovak Republic
  • Andrea Vargová Department of Chemistry, Constantine the Philosopher University in Nitra, Tr. A. Hlinku 1, Nitra, SK- 949 01, Slovak Republic
  • Ondrej Hegedűs Regional Authority of Public Health in Nitra, Štefánikova 58, Nitra, SK- 949 63, Slovak Republic
  • Tímea Judit Pernyeszi Department of Analytical and Environmental Chemistry University of Pécs, Ifjúság u. 6, Pécs, HU-7624, Hungary

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.36547/nbc.1217

Keywords:

induced phytoextraction, EDTA, lead, garden pea

Abstract

The effect of chelating agent – EDTA (ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid) was used for induced phytoextraction to increase intensity of lead transfer from roots to aboveground parts of garden pea. Pot experiments with contaminated soil substrata (50 mg Pb.kg-1 and 100 mg Pb.kg-1) were established for experimental purposes in growth chamber. The results showed that application of 5 and 10 mmol EDTA.kg-1 to experimental variants with 100 mg Pb.kg-1 doubled the increase of lead uptake by pea roots in comparison with variants without EDTA addition, which was statistically confirmed. Intensive lead transfer was observed from roots to aboveground parts of pea after application of 5 and 10 mmol EDTA.kg-1 in variant with 50 mg Pb.kg-1 (40-fold increase), as well as in variant with 100 mg Pb.kg-1 (17-fold increase). The results showed that induced phytoextraction can improve the mobility of lead from soil to plant roots. Application of 5 mmol EDTA.kg-1 resulted to 40-fold increase of lead transfer to green plant parts, despite the fact, that garden pea does not belong to conventional metal hyperaccumulating plant species. Following the results, pea could be used for decontamination of arable soil. The optimal EDTA concentration seems to be 5 mmol.kg-1. Therefore, application of 10 mmol EDTA.kg-1 decreased root mass about 55%, which resulted to decrease the intensity of lead uptake.

Downloads

Published

2021-11-22

How to Cite

Hegedűsová, A., Jakabová, S., Vargová, A. ., Hegedűs, O., & Pernyeszi, T. J. (2021). Use of phytoremediation techniques for elimination of lead from polluted soils. Nova Biotechnologica Et Chimica, 9(2), 125-132. https://doi.org/10.36547/nbc.1217

Issue

Section

Research Articles
Received 2021-10-11
Published 2021-11-22