Basic interactions of Aspergillus niger with Se(IV)

Authors

  • Martin Urík Geological Institute, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mlynská dolina, Bratislava, SK-842 15, Slovak Republic
  • Jaroslav Ševc Geological Institute, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mlynská dolina, Bratislava, SK-842 15, Slovak Republic
  • Pavol Littera Geological Institute, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mlynská dolina, Bratislava, SK-842 15, Slovak Republic
  • Marek Kolenčík Geological Institute, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mlynská dolina, Bratislava, SK-842 15, Slovak Republic
  • Slavomír Čerňanský Department of Ecosozology and Physiotactics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mlynská dolina, Bratislava, SK-842 15, Slovak Republic

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.36547/nbc.1219

Keywords:

selenite, filamentous fungi, biovolatilization, bioaccumulation

Abstract

Filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is commonly found on decaying vegetation or in indoor environment and has a number of uses, including application in bioremediation. Hence, the basic interactions of this common mould with selenite were studied, including biovolatilization, bioaccumulation and toxicity effects of selenite on fungal growth. The fungal strain, originally isolated from noncontaminated soil, was cultivated under aerobic conditions on liquid cultivation media with concentration of Se(IV) 19 or 27 mg.l-1 during 25 days. The fungal growth in the presence of selenite was not inhibited when compared to control, only the sporulation was reduced. The concentration of Se(IV) in liquid medium decreased rapidly within first ten days to 1 mg.l-1. However, according to results from the 25th day of cultivation, the concentration of total selenium in medium did not change significantly and only negligible amount of selenium (less then 1%) was bioaccumulated. That indicates some biotransformation of selenite into other selenium species. During the cultivation, up to 21% of total amount of selenium was transformed into volatile derivatives (biovolatilization) by filamentous fungus A. niger.

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Published

2021-11-22

How to Cite

Urík, M., Ševc, J., Littera, P., Kolenčík, M., & Čerňanský, S. (2021). Basic interactions of Aspergillus niger with Se(IV). Nova Biotechnologica Et Chimica, 9(2), 141-145. https://doi.org/10.36547/nbc.1219

Issue

Section

Research Articles
Received 2021-10-11
Published 2021-11-22