Depuration of a Freshwater Clam (Batissa Violacea) from Rewa River in Fiji Using a Bio-Filter Set-Up in Closed and Open Water Circulatory System

Authors

  • Ashneel Ajay Singh School of Agriculture, Geography, Environment, Ocean and Natural Sciences, The University of the South Pacific, Suva, Fiji, Department of Science, School of Science and Technology, The University of Fiji, Lautoka, Fiji
  • Ravinesh Ram Department of Fisheries, College of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, Fiji National University, Koronivia, Fiji
  • Sheemal Vandhana Kumar Department of Science, School of Science and Technology, The University of Fiji, Lautoka, Fiji
  • Sheenal Aashna Department of Science, School of Science and Technology, The University of Fiji, Lautoka, Fiji
  • Shipaldika Verma Department of Science, School of Science and Technology, The University of Fiji, Lautoka, Fiji.
  • Zafiar Tasmeen Naaz Department of Science, School of Science and Technology, The University of Fiji, Lautoka, Fiji
  • A. A. Mohamed Hatha Department of Marine Biology, Microbiology and Biochemistry, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kerala, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.36547/nbc.824

Keywords:

aerobic plate count, Batissa violacea, biofilter, bivalve, coliform, depuration

Abstract

The effectiveness of the freshwater bivalve Batissa violacea depuration was tested in closed and open water circulatory system over a 48 h period. The closed circulatory system included a sand biofilter. Microbial levels were assessed every 4 h using Total Aerobic Plate Count (TPC) for heterotrophs and Most Probable Number (MPN) for coliforms. TPC and coliform loads in bivalve tissue reduced rapidly to low and undetectable levels in a closed circulatory system while open system showed a slower reduction. Both TPC and coliform loads remained above detectable levels throughout the depuration period. Closed system showed similar patterns of logarithmic reduction of TPC and coliforms in all cases with R2>0.95 and p<0.001. Similar results were observed for tank water however, reduction of TPC and coliforms were slower. Biofilm formation was observed in the interior walls of the aquarium tanks over 48 h in all cases. Physicochemical parameters did not show any significant change. The reduction in TPC and coliform load in B. violacea suggests that biofilter in a closed water circulatory system is a simple, cost-effective, water conserving and effective way to significantly reduce the spoilage and coliform bacterial load that is accumulated in the clams.

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Published

2021-08-18

How to Cite

Singh, A. A., Ram, R., Kumar, S. V. ., Aashna, S. ., Verma, S. ., Naaz, Z. T. ., & Hatha, A. A. M. (2021). Depuration of a Freshwater Clam (Batissa Violacea) from Rewa River in Fiji Using a Bio-Filter Set-Up in Closed and Open Water Circulatory System . Nova Biotechnologica Et Chimica, e824. https://doi.org/10.36547/nbc.824

Issue

Section

Research Articles
Received 2021-01-18
Accepted 2021-05-21
Published 2021-08-18